What plants are affected by mosaic virus?

Can mosaic virus spread to other plants?

Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is named for one of the first plants in which it was found in the 1800s. However, it can infect well over 350 different species of plants.

Which plant is affected by virus?

INTRODUCTION

Rank Virus Author of virus description
1 Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) Karen-Beth G. Scholthof
2 Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) Scott Adkins
3 Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) Henryk Czosnek
4 Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Peter Palukaitis

Does mosaic virus stay in soil?

Unlike TMV (tobacco mosaic virus), CMV is not seedborne in tomato and does not persist in plant debris in the soil or on workers’ hands or clothing. The occurrence of this virus is erratic and unpredictable; consequently, control of this disease can be difficult.

Can you eat cucumbers with mosaic virus?

Yes, you can eat squash and melons that are infected with mosaic virus. These viruses are not harmful to humans and do not cause the fruit to rot. Often the discoloration is only skin deep. In cases where fruit are severely distorted, the texture of the fruit may be affected and may not be desirable for eating.

What does mosaic virus do?

THE TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS

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Tobacco mosaic virus causes a mottled browning of tobacco leaves, and accordingly is of major economic importance. It also infects other crops, most notably tomatoes. The virus is spread mechanically from infected plants to scratched or damaged leaves of normal plants.

What is mosaic symptom?

Mosaic symptoms are variable but commonly include irregular leaf mottling (light and dark green or yellow patches or streaks). Leaves are commonly stunted, curled, or puckered; veins may be lighter than normal or banded with dark green or yellow.

Can plant viruses jump to humans?

It is currently accepted that a strict separation exists between plant and vertebrate viruses regarding their host range and pathogenicity, and plant viruses are believed to infect only plants. Accordingly, plant viruses are not considered to present potential pathogenicity to humans and other vertebrates.

How do you treat a virus in plants?

Unfortunately, there are no chemical controls for plant virus diseases. Dig up and dispose of affected plants – to prevent it from spreading to other plants.

Can plants fight viruses?

Interestingly, plants have an immune system too. In plants and insects, a very effective way to combat a virus is through a process known as gene silencing. This mechanism treats a virus as a gene that is being expressed out of control. Thus, plant cells turn it off by dicing the viral RNA into small pieces.