What is a live stitch in knitting?

What is a live stitch?

The Live Stitch to Bind Off Graft, as the name clearly suggests, is a seaming method that involves seaming one edge with live stitches and another with an edge of either bind off or cast on stitches.

Is grafting the same as Kitchener stitch?

Kitchener Stitch Will Make You Fall in Love With Seaming. … It’s called the Kitchener stitch. The Kitchener stitch (also known as “grafting”) involves weaving two live (still on the needle) edges together without creating a ridge — or even a break in the stitching.

What does provisionally cast on mean?

A provisional cast-on is a temporary cast-on method that holds onto live stitches so that they can be knit into later. Designed to be removable, you cast on using waste yarn or knotting cord. We recommend using a smooth, firm yarn that’s in a contrasting color—easy to see and unzip from your live stitches.

Is there an alternative to Kitchener Stitch?

The Finchley graft is an easy to remember alternative to the Kitchener stitch for joining 2 rows of live knitting stitches.

Why is it called Kitchener Stitch?

During the First World War it is said that Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War, prompted the invention of a special graft for socks to prevent chafing. It came to be known as ‘the Kitchener Stitch’.

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How much tail do you need for Kitchener Stitch?

Cut the yarn so that the tail is approximately four times the length of the row of stitches. For example, if the live stitches are about 5 inches wide on the needle when spread out comfortably, then cut the yarn with a tail approximately 20 inches long.