What does Mama do to show that the quilts belong to Maggie?

Why does Mama think Maggie is the rightful owner of the quilts?

Mama understands that Maggie, not Dee, should have the quilts, because Maggie will respect them by using them in the way they were intended to be used.

Did Mama do the right thing by giving the quilts to Maggie?

Expert Answers

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the…

What does Maggie say mama should do with the quilts?

Mama has “promised to give them quilts to Maggie, for when she marries John Thomas.” Dee is indeed angry in response, and her reaction is what provides the title of Alice Walker’s short story: “Maggie can’t appreciate these quilts!” she said. “She’d probably be backward enough to put them to everyday use.”

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What use does the mother contemplate that Maggie will make of the quilts?

These quilts are familial heirlooms, and Maggie’s mother likes to use them as often as possible. They represent the family’s history and heritage to each character.

Why did Maggie want the quilts?

Why does Maggie want the quilts? Unlike her sister, Dee, Maggie loves the family quilts because she knows the people whose lives and stories are represented by them. … Her mother has promised Maggie the quilts, which Dee has already once refused, when she gets married because they are meaningful to her.

Why does Mama choose Maggie over Dee?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

Why would Mama prefer Maggie get the quilts and use them for Everyday Use?

Her desire to hang the quilts, in a museumlike exhibit, suggests that she feels reverence for them but that to her they are essentially foreign, impersonal objects. Mama understands that Maggie, not Dee, should have the quilts, because Maggie will respect them by using them in the way they were intended to be used.

Why does Dee think Maggie should not have the quilts?

Dee thinks the quilts should be preserved as art objects; not used up. Why does Dee think that Maggie should not have the quilts? Dee says her mother doesn’t understand that the hand-stitched quilts are important and should be preserved.

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Why is Maggie scared of Dee in Everyday Use?

Maggie believes that Dee has not been exposed to any real struggles, and to some extent, she is jealous of her sister. Maggie is of the opinion that she has sacrificed a lot for her sister’s happiness.

Why does Dee think Mama and Maggie don’t understand their heritage?

Why does Dee think Maggie and Mama don’t understand their heritage? Dee thinks Mama and Maggie don’t understand their heritage because they don’t change from it. In Dee’s mind, Maggie and Mama lack the “Ethnic Pride” to leave the historical borders and live a prosperous life.

What does Dee mean when she says mama doesn’t understand their heritage?

When Dee/Wangero tells her mother, “You just don’t understand… your heritage,” she implies that hand-made artistic items in their family should be put on display instead of being used. … Dee has rejected her birth name, which comes from Dicie, a family name traceable to the Civil War, in favor of Wangero.

Why is Dee angry at the end of the story?

At the end of the story, Dee, who was always brighter, better-looking, and favored, is angry because her mother refuses to give the quilts which she, Grandma Dee, and Big Dee made over the years.