Does Dee want the quilts in everyday use?

Why does Dee want the quilts in everyday use?

Why does Dee want the quilts? Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

Why does Dee want the quilts so bad?

Dee wants the quilts to display them in her home as symbols of this greater heritage and as symbols of that which defined her ancestor’s humanity before captivity dehumanized them. Neither Dee nor her mother are right or wrong since Dee’s mother’s sense of ancestry extends only to her valued and cherished memories.

Does Dee get the quilts in everyday use?

Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. Who gets the quilts at the end of the story? At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

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Who should get the quilts Maggie or Dee?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

Why did Maggie want the quilts?

Why does Maggie want the quilts? Unlike her sister, Dee, Maggie loves the family quilts because she knows the people whose lives and stories are represented by them. … Her mother has promised Maggie the quilts, which Dee has already once refused, when she gets married because they are meaningful to her.

Why does Dee think Maggie should not have the quilts?

Dee thinks the quilts should be preserved as art objects; not used up. Why does Dee think that Maggie should not have the quilts? Dee says her mother doesn’t understand that the hand-stitched quilts are important and should be preserved.

Why does Dee want the quilts now but not when she went off to college?

Dee wants the old quilts for several reasons but mainly because she wants to display them as part of her “heritage” in her home in the city. She does not believe that they are appreciated in the country with Maggie and Mama because they actually use the quilts.

Why is Dee angry at the end of the story?

At the end of the story, Dee, who was always brighter, better-looking, and favored, is angry because her mother refuses to give the quilts which she, Grandma Dee, and Big Dee made over the years. … Maggie who was burned as a child and has never left home, will continue to live there and actually use the quilts every day.

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What do the quilts mean to Dee?

To Dee, the quilt is nothing more than a piece of art: something that would look nice in her new place. … The quilt becomes a “bone of contention” when Dee insists that she should have it. At the same time, however, she does not want it because of the loving family hands that have toiled over it.

What does the quilt represent to Dee to Maggie and to Mama?

The quilts bring together the family in a battle of self identity and history. Maggie was promised the right to them, Dee expects to be given them, and Mama is stuck in the middle of her children and her ancestors.

Why does Mama give the quilts to Maggie?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

What is the main point of Everyday Use by Alice Walker?

Through Dee, “Everyday Use” explores how education affects the lives of people who come from uneducated communities, considering the benefits of an education as well as the tradeoffs. Alice Walker clearly believes that education can be, in certain ways, helpful to individuals.