Quick Answer: How do you figure out yardage for quilt backing?

How many yards do I need for a quilt backing?

Take the length of your quilt and double it, adding a half yard to your total. The extra half yard is allowance for shrinkage and uneven cutting. If you have a quilt top that is 70 inches per side, you need at least 140 (+18) inches for the back. Ideally you want this in one length, or two 79″ lengths.

How much bigger should the backing be than the quilt top?

Size of the back: must be at least 6″ wider on each side, top and bottom, than your quilt top. A total of 12″ larger than your quilt top. Trim the top and bottom edges of your backing so they are straight and square.

How many yards of fabric do I need for a twin size quilt backing?

For example, with a 14-inch drop, a twin quilt typically is 70 inches wide and 90 inches long. Seventy multiplied by 90 equals 6,300, plus 20 percent equals 7,560, divided by 1,296 equals 5.8, rounded up is 6. Each of the top and underside requires a minimum of 6 yards of fabric.

How many yards of fabric do I need calculator?

Dimensions that fit into the width of the fabric

Take the total length you need and divide by 36 to calculate how many yards you need. Most of our fabric is sold in full yard increments, so round up to the nearest yard.

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How much 108 backing do I need for a quilt?

The first you need 2 yards of 108″ wide fabric. You will have a 25″ strip left over which is enough to back 2-4 throw pillows. If you orient your fabric the other way and buy 2.5 yards of backing fabric, you will have a 40″ wide strip on the side extra and it’s big enough to get 1-2 baby size quilt backs out of!

How wide should the binding on a quilt be?

Cut enough strips (bias or crossgrain) to go around the quilt plus 8″ for cornering and seams. Strip width can vary from 2″ to 2 1/2″ and even wider if you prefer a larger binding than the traditional 1/4″ width. Quilt binding strips are generally sewn together with a diagonal seam for the most inconspicuous joining.